Lyme Disease

Compartilhe esta página
Imprimir este artigo
Esta página foi útil?
Também chamado: Lyme antibodies detection; Lyme antibodies IgM/IgG by Western blot; Lyme disease by PCR
Nome formal: Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies, IgM/IgG; Borrelia burgdorferi DNA detection by PCR

De relance

Por que fazer este exame?

To see if you have been exposed to the bacterium that causes Lyme disease

Quando fazer este exame?

When you show symptoms of Lyme disease, especially when you live in or have recently visited the northeastern or western United States and suspect that you have been bitten by a tick

Amostra:

A blood sample drawn from a vein in the arm; sometimes a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample or sample of joint fluid (synovial fluid)

É necessária alguma preparação?

None

A amostra

O que está sendo pesquisado?

Lyme disease tests measure Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in the blood or in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) if there are signs and symptoms of central nervous system disease. These antibodies are produced by the body's immune system in response to exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Infected deer ticks or black-legged ticks transmit this bacterium to a person through a bite. The disease is most common in the spring and summer in the regions where these ticks live, the northeastern and western United States.

Lyme disease infection causes symptoms that may include a characteristic "bulls-eye" rash that spreads from the site of the bite, fever, chills, headache, and fatigue. If left untreated, Lyme disease may progress to cause intermittent joint pain, meningitis, facial paralysis (Bell's palsy), weakness and numbness in the arms and legs, memory problems, and may rarely affect the heart or eyes.

It takes the body some time to begin producing B. burgdorferi antibodies. B. burgdorferi IgM (immunoglobulin M) antibodies are usually detectable in the blood about two to three weeks after exposure. IgM levels increase to maximum concentrations at about six weeks and then begin to decline. IgG (immunoglobulin G) antibodies are detectable several weeks after exposure, increase to maximum levels at about four to six months, and may remain at high levels for several years.

Two tests are typically used to detect and confirm Lyme disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that an ELISA or IFA test method be used first to measure B. burgdorferi IgM and/or IgG antibodies. Since these tests may be positive with infections caused by other bacteria similar to B. burgdorferi, such as the bacterium that causes syphilis, the CDC recommends that any positive or indeterminate test results then be followed by a second test, called a Western Blot, in order to confirm the findings.

Como a amostra é obtida para o exame?

A blood sample is taken by needle from a vein in the arm. If there are symptoms of meningitis, a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is collected by a doctor from the lower back using a procedure called a lumbar puncture or spinal tap.

NOTA: Se exames médicos em você ou em alguém importante para você o deixam ansioso ou constrangido, ou se você tem dificuldade de lidar com eles, leia um ou mais dos seguintes artigos: Lidando com dor, desconforto ou ansiedade durante o exame, Conselhos sobre exames de sangue, Conselhos para ajudar crianças durante exames médicos, and Conselhos para ajudar idosos durante exames médicos.

Outro artigo, Siga essa amostra, fornece uma visão da coleta e do processamento de uma amostra de sangue e de uma amostra de cultura da garganta.

É necessário algum preparo para garantir a qualidade da amostra?

No test preparation is needed.

O exame

Perguntas frequentes

Pergunte ao laboratório

* indica um campo necessário



Por favor, indique se você é:   
  
  



Você deve fornecer um endereço de e-mail válido para receber uma resposta.



| |

Fontes do artigo

« Voltar para páginas relacionadas

NOTA: Este artigo se baseia em pesquisas que incluíram as fontes citadas e a experiência coletiva de Lab Tests Online Conselho de Revisão Editorial. Este artigo é submetido a revisões periódicas do Conselho Editorial, e pode ser atualizado como resultado dessas revisões. Novas fontes citadas serão adicionadas à lista e distinguidas das fontes originais usadas.

Sources Used in Current Review

Wormser GP, et al. The Clinical Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention of Lyme Disease, Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis, and Babesiosis: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Clinical Infectious Diseases 2006;43:1089–1134. Available online at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/508667?cookieSet=1 through http://www.journals.uchicago.edu. Accessed June 2009.

(May 1, 2008) Press Release: Agreement Ends Lyme Disease Investigation by Connecticut Attorney General. Available online at http://www.idsociety.org/Content.aspx?id=11182 through http://www.idsociety.org. Accessed June 2009.

Pagana, K. D. & Pagana, T. J. (© 2007). Mosby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 8th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO. Pp 632-633.

Wu, A. (© 2006). Tietz Clinical Guide to Laboratory Tests, 4th Edition: Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO. Pp 1538.

Forbes, B. et. al. (© 2007). Bailey & Scott's Diagnostic Microbiology, 12th Edition: Mosby Elsevier Press, St. Louis, MO. Pp 537-539.

(Modified 2009 January 27). Learn About Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/ through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed March 2009.

(Reviewed 2008 October 7). Lyme Disease Diagnosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/ld_humandisease_diagnosis.htm through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed March 2009.

Editorial staff (Updated 2008 May). Lyme Disease. Familydoctor.org [On-line information]. Available online at http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/common/infections/common/bacterial/257.printerview.html through http://familydoctor.org. Accessed March 2009.

(2007 June 27). Beware of Ticks … & Lyme Disease. U.S. Food and Drug Administration [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/lymedisease062707.html through http://www.fda.gov. Accessed March 2009.

(Reviewed 2008 October 8). Lyme Disease Treatment and Prognosis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/ld_humandisease_treatment.htm through http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed March 2009.

Mayo Clinic Staff (2008 May 2). Lyme disease. MayoClinic.com [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/lyme-disease/DS00116/METHOD=print&DSECTION=all through http://www.mayoclinic.com. Accessed March 2009.

(2008 July). Lyme Disease - The Facts The Challenge. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases [On-line information]. PDF available for download at http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/topics/lymeDisease/PDF/LymeDisease.pdf through http://www3.niaid.nih.gov. Accessed March 2009.

(© 2009). Lyme Disease: A Patient's Guide. American College of Physicians [On-line information]. Available online at http://www.acponline.org/clinical_information/resources/lyme_disease/patient/ through http://www.acponline.org. Accessed March 2009.

Edlow, J. (Updated 2008 December 12). Tick-Borne Diseases, Lyme. Emedicine [On-line information]. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/786767-overview through http://emedicine.medscape.com. Accessed March 2009.

Sources Used in Previous Reviews

Thomas, Clayton L., Editor (1997). Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary. F.A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, PA [18th Edition].

Pagana, Kathleen D. & Pagana, Timothy J. (2001). Mosby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO.